We cannot thank Jay DeLancy enough for the vast amounts of volunteer time and more-limited funds he’s spent, as other voter fraud sleuths, chasing voter impersonation fraud, dead voters (some of whom aren’t), clerical errors and data entry errors in the state’s voter records. (Identity theft is his latest bugaboo.) Since accuracy of the lists is the Voter Integrity Project’s concern, perhaps they would donate those funds to the state Board of Elections, earmarked for database maintenance instead. It would free up the local Voter Integri-T-Party to spend its time registering new voters, getting them to the polls and showing the rest of us how to win elections the American way. Unless they lack the electoral confidence that they can.

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Apr
11

Friday Open Thread

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It is Friday, right?


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It’s been years since I last posted to this blog. Decided to do so today because there’s an important issue that needs to be discussed within the Buncombe Democratic Party … and I don’t have another vehicle to start the conversation.

As you may know, I support Todd Williams in the current District Attorney race.  But what y’all may not know is why.

What I didn’t write in the LTTE, because I didn’t want to be confrontational before more information became publicly available, is that Ron Moore had possession of evidence that would have cleared the names of 5 people for murder – and didn’t turn it over to their defense attorneys.

This is upsetting enough. What’s salt-in-the-wound is that this serious miscarriage of justice is not being discussed intelligently within the establishment of the local Buncombe Democratic Party during this year’s DA primary race. “Moore’s a good man” is the common mantra when faced with facts around this issue, or pretty much every other scandal concerning Moore.

Ron Moore may very well be a good man. Fine. It really depends on which side of the prison-bars you’re sitting on – I guess.

The Asheville Citizen times has full coverage of the story here. But the highlights are:

1) Ron Moore ignored DNA evidence.

2) Another person admitted to the crime in 2003, but Moore didn’t re-open the case for investigation.

3) Videotape evidence corroborating the 2003 confession was ignored.

I know Moore is a Democrat. He might even be a great guy in-person. But 5 people spent years in jail because Moore didn’t want to do his job properly. Frankly, if it had been 5 white middle-class kids – it is my humble option he would have been disbarred over this by now. In the coming years this issue is going to develop into a major scandal, putting the already tarnished credibility of the DA’s office in serious jeopardy.

The local Democratic party has a choice this year: During the primary y’all can put forth a 24-year incumbent with a history of opaqueness, sweeping serious issues such as the evidence-room scandal under the rug, and preventing justice; or you can submit someone who will focus on doing the right thing.

ON EDIT: Grammar & spelling


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Renewed attacks on voting rights in North Carolina, Pennsylvania and other states are as much about power as about policy and race. The hand wringing over elusive “fraud” is because America’s majority ethnic group sees its traditional grip on power eroding with shifting demographics.

In North Carolina last week, Republican lawmakers again raised the alarm over the possibility that hundreds — maybe thousands — had criminally cast ballots in two states in the 2012 election. GOP leaders were quick to insist that the numbers justified the draconian voting law they passed in the last legislative session. The U.S. Department of Justice has challenged the law in court.

Chris Kromm of the Institute for Southern Studies just as quickly debunked the study by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach whose office, after checking 5 million voter records in 2013, “couldn’t provide any evidence of a single instance in which the Interstate Crosscheck’s data had led to an actual legal charge of voter fraud.” Because the data, Kromm writes, “offers no proof such fraud is occurring.” Requiring citizens to present identity cards to vote would have no effect on voting in multiple states.

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Apr
07

You Invited Them

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“I don’t get all the anti-immigrant sentiment in this country. Because this is a country that says this is the greatest country in the world. We’re the best. We’re number one. Then we get upset when people actually show up. But when you advertise something … sometimes people buy it. That’s how it works.”
– Indian-American comedian Hari Kondabolu

Over the years, I’ve opened up in-flight magazines and seen multi-page, color spreads advertising Asheville and western North Carolina as great places to vacation and to build a summer home. Come hike our majestic mountains. Visit our beautiful waterfalls. Tour the fabulous Biltmore Estate. And what better place to retire than the mountains of western North Carolina? Our developers, builders and retailers are anxious to build your dream home for you.

Western North Carolina’s marketing efforts succeeded beyond our wildest dreams. Downtown was reborn. Asheville made top-ten list after top-ten list. People came. Locals made money. Retirees retired here. But newcomers brought their tastes and politics with them. In-migration changed local culture. Some natives are uneasy around people unlike themselves, and resentful. Sure, we wanted their business. But we didn’t want them, you know, in our business.

Hello? You invited them.


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Apr
06

Sunday Morning Music

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Apr
04

Clock In

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The following is a cross-post from NeverNesters, a blog on local politics, Asheville real estate and what to expect when you’re not. 

 

Between classes on dramatic structure and narrative poetry while working toward my MFA, I’d sometimes attend an unfriendly Garden City bar for a pint. One day, in 2008, events external to ESPN had become so compelling that even those cold provincial pubsters switched one TV (a little one) to CNN. My memory’s hazy–was it the floor of the House or the New York Stock Exchange? was it mostly the ticker I watched or the muted heads, their panic unspooled across the screen in tortured, Close Caption’d grammar?–but the thrust is clear: the economy was blowing up. The Dow was down 600, 650, 700. I sipped my beer, then returned to Adelphi just in time for a playwriting workshop. This is my preferred anecdote to explain how I acquired such a satisfying and ornamental piece of debt.

Within a couple hours of finishing my last class, Arielle and I were beating a retreat back to Asheville; and three years after graduating from UNCA we were renting a tiny apartment in Kennilworth, she waiting tables and I languishing among the unemployed–only now with a Master’s. When we had fifty bucks to spend we bought whisky and smokes because, what else do you do with fifty bucks? It was basically impossible, then, to imagine ever playing a serious role in things. Read More→


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Apr
04

Friday Open Thread

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shapeimage_4Terry Van Duyn replaces Martin Nesbitt in the NC Senate. Buncombe Democrats also selected her to replace him on the fall ballot last night.

What else significant happened this week?


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Apr
03

The Union Business

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“The union business”. Americans Against the Tea Party put a Target corporate video up online that purports to help their employees protect themselves from the wolves of main street, those nasty union business guys. In it, unions are portrayed as just another business. One that is intent on stealing your money, taking your job, and ruining your prospects for employment. In exchange for your casual signature on a perfectly innocent-looking form. The trouble is that most people already believe this crap. Read More→


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Apr
02

No Limits

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No, it’s not a new running shoe slogan.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday expanded how much political donors can give candidates and parties in federal elections by striking down a key pillar of campaign finance law.

On a 5-4 vote, the court struck down the overall limits on how much individuals can give to candidates, parties and political action committees in total during the federal two-year election cycle.

From John Roberts’ opinion: “And those who govern should be the last people to help decide who should govern.”

I kid you not.


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