Archive for Parties

Nov
08

New Democrats are not amused

Posted by: | Comments (0)

It was their party and they’ll cry if they want to. Centrist Democrats threatened by the party’s Warren Wing find themselves out of step with a more populist message. Is it really a “lurch” to the left, or are Democrats beginning to find their voices again? Liberal is no longer the epithet conservatives once made it.

The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank explained last week how a few remaining Blue Dogs made protest votes during the election for Speaker of the House. “Colin Powell,” declared Tennessee Democrat Jim Cooper. “Jim Cooper,” voted Gwen Graham of Florida, another centrist Democrat. Other Democrats voted in unison for Nancy Pelosi. Except for Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona. She voted for Rep. John Lewis, the Georgia Democrat.

Third Way, “a vestige of the New Democratic movement,” issued a report that blames the populist wing for the Democrats losing ground and registration since 2008. Democrats should “rigorously question the electoral value of today’s populist agenda,” Third Way argues. Milbank is not so sure:

It was a good effort, but Third Way came up short. First, there really aren’t two wings of the party anymore; the pro-business Democrats have lost. “There’s zero question,” Jonathan Cowan, president of Third Way, acknowledged in an interview Tuesday, “that the party is now a populist party.”

It’s also dubious to say, as Third Way does, that the elections of 2010, 2012 and 2014 were about Democratic populism; that theme has only become prominent recently. Also suspect is the Third Way argument, often heard from corporate interests, that reducing inequality could hurt growth. Plenty of evidence says otherwise.

Read More→

Comments (0)
Oct
30

Campus Crusade for Koch

Posted by: | Comments (0)

While some college students are being introduced to Nietzsche, Freud, and organic chemistry, Charles and David Koch want to introduce them to the Kochification Church, bless their hearts. The Koch Brothers (shouldn’t they just stick to cough drops?) are spending more than ever to “evangelize their gospel of economic freedom” on campuses, reports Al Jazeera.

“The [Koch] network is fully integrated,” Kevin Gentry told the annual Koch network meeting last summer. And not only with students, but also in “building state-based capabilities and election capabilities” into a “talent pipeline.” Sounds as if the cult of Ayn Rand has branched out into multi-level marketing. Oh, glory!

We knew their acolytes have been introducing students to the Randian gospel by bribing colleges endowing chairs in economic departments that will agree to teach “Atlas Shrugged” and instill a philosophy of “wealth maximization.” But as Charles ages, he seems to have redoubled his efforts, hoping to see the fruit of his evangelism in his lifetime.

Have you accepted Ayn Rand as your personal savior?

Read More→

Comments (0)

You knew right away America was in trouble when the branding for CNBC’s GOP debate coverage last night read “YOUR MONEY * YOUR VOTE” — echoes of Jack Benny’s tightwad character getting mugged:

Thug: Don’t make a move. This is a stickup! Now come on. Your money or your life.
[long pause]
Thug: [repeating] Look, bud, I said ‘Your money or your life.’
Jack Benny: I’m thinking it over!

The rest of the night, too, was one, long punchline. The full transcript is here. Sean Illing has a candidate-by-candidate summary at Salon. But the moderators were “mostly awful” and it was “two and a half hours of political gas.”

CNBC’s moderators were so awful they might have asked candidates what costumes they were wearing for Halloween. (Maybe they just didn’t get around to it.) But it meant candidates garnered easy applause in attacking the “liberal” media whenever asked a question they didn’t like, or just to fill time. Think Progress observed that the network that launched the T-party was “too liberal to host the Republican debate on Wednesday.”

Read More→

Comments (0)
Oct
27

Democratic Pros and Cons-ervatives

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Bernie Sanders got his close-up last night with MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow. There was nothing new policy-wise.

However, Sanders and Maddow discussed at length his 1996 vote on the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which then-President Clinton signed. Sanders challenged Hillary Clinton’s claim last week that President Clinton signed DOMA because he believed there was “enough political momentum” to amend the constitution [with regard to marriage], and that signing DOMA (as well as “Don’t ask, don’t tell” and the crime bill headed off worse outcomes. “You can’t say that DOMA was passed in order to prevent something worse,” Sanders said. In an indirect swipe at Hillary Clinton (who was not an elected official at the time), Sanders asserted that he made the tough choices when they were tough choices.

Read More→

Comments (0)
Oct
24

No wonder they’re so angry

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Watching last night’s Hillary Clinton interview with Rachel Maddow this morning. Particularly interested with her concern for regaining Democratic control in the states ahead of the 2020 census. Asked what she did after eleven straight hours of testimony before “Tea Party Trey” Gowdy’s Benghazi committee, she replied, “I had my whole team come over to my house, and we sat around eating Indian food and drinking wine and beer.” And talking about sports and TV. Unwinding. Behaving in private as if they were real people. Diabolical.

But of course, painting Clinton as unfeeling and Other was the point of the hearings, wasn’t it?

Matt Taibbi had some juicy comments on that at Rolling Stone. Never a fan of the kind of Clintonian “transactional politics” that triangulates on policy in service to “keeping Republicans out of office,” Taibbi nonetheless conceded that Trey Gowdy made a pretty good case for that strategy on Thursday. “It’s hard to imagine a political compromise that wouldn’t be justified if its true aim would be to keep people like those jackasses out of power.”

Read More→

Comments (0)
Oct
23

The Benghazi snake eats its tail

Posted by: | Comments (2)

What used to be called movement conservatism took off [under] Ronald Reagan’s presidency. “Real Americans” decided that any Democrat in the White House is illegitimate – and any law, and any court ruling with which they disagree. Members insist on calling the Democratic Party the Democrat Party – emphasis on RAT. Looking to take down Bill Clinton, they paid investigators in Arkansas to dig dirt on him soon after he took office. They ginned up a score of faux scandals, allegations, and internet rumors, culminating with Clinton’s impeachment in 1998. Clinton presided over an economy about which Republicans should have crowed, but because it wasn’t one of their own in the White House, that too was illegitimate.

Top Republican leaders held a private dinner at the Caucus Room in Georgetown to discuss how to destroy Barack Obama’s presidency on the night of his inauguration in 2009. Next came Birtherism, racist images, slurs, the Tea Party, and new voting restrictions in nearly two dozen states. A half dozen GOP lawmakers and Sarah Palin suggested impeachment for Obama.

A year before the 2016 election, a Texas Republican congressman suggested that Hillary Clinton is “subject to impeachment” the day she takes office. This movement has no use for democracy if it cannot control the outcome.

Read More→

Categories : National, Republicans
Comments (2)
Oct
22

Road to Dystopia

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Rep. Paul Ryan seems to have cleared the hurdles to replacing John Boehner as Speaker now that a “supermajority” of the House Freedom Caucus has agreed to support Ryan for the job, if not to endorse him outright. Ryan is not far right enough for enough of them to prevent that. So uncertainties remain reports the Washington Post:

Ryan could still decide not to serve as speaker, and some conservative activists have engaged in a vigorous campaign to cast doubt on his record, which might give some members cold feet before votes are cast next week.

This was not the job Ryan wanted, after all. Perhaps, as Shakespeare put it, Ryan will have greatness thrust upon him. Peter Dreier disabuses Salon readers of any notion that the selfie-admiring Ryan was either born great or achieved greatness:

Let’s start with Ryan’s outrageous hypocrisy. Ryan worships at the altar of novelist Ayn Rand, the philosopher of you’re-on-your-own selfishness, whose books have been required reading for his Congressional staffers. Like Rand, he consistently demonizes people who improve their lives with the help of government. Ryan seems to be unaware of how much his own family and his own financial success has been influenced by “big government.”

Read More→

Categories : National, Republicans
Comments (0)

People ask me, Bernie or Hillary? I tell them I don’t care. My fight is not in Washington, D.C. It is here. I care that someone from the left side of the aisle wins the presidency in November 2016. I need those next 2-3 Supreme Court picks. I’m just not that particular which left-leaning president gets to pick them. And good luck getting them approved by a Republican-controlled Senate. (More on that later.)

The old saying goes: Democrats want to fall in love; Republicans just fall in line. You might have trouble convincing John Boehner of the latter, but the former still seems operative. Bernie-mania is this year’s Obama-mania. It is as if the left’s disappointments with the Obama administration never happened. They’ve found a brand new lover and it will be totally different this time. For a movement confident of its intellectual heft, we are really slow learners.

Matthew Yglesias points out the obvious:

The presidency is extremely important, of course. But there are also thousands of critically important offices all the way down the ballot. And the vast majority — 70 percent of state legislatures, more than 60 percent of governors, 55 percent of attorneys general and secretaries of state — are in Republicans hands. And, of course, Republicans control both chambers of Congress. Indeed, even the House infighting reflects, in some ways, the health of the GOP coalition. Republicans are confident they won’t lose power in the House and are hungry for a vigorous argument about how best to use the power they have.

Read More→

I’m sorry, ‘He kept us safe’ is incorrect and was not in the form of a question. The correct response: Who is George W. Bush?

It is the Final Jeopardy clue that stumps Republicans every time. Even brother Jeb! has trouble with it.

Surprisingly, Donald Trump does not:

The controversy began Friday morning when Trump implied that the former president could share some blame for the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 Americans, as he was in office at the time.

“When you talk about George Bush, I mean, say what you want, the World Trade Center came down during his time,” Trump said on Bloomberg TV.

Bloomberg anchor Stephanie Ruhle interjected, “Hold on, you can’t blame George Bush for that,” before Trump stood by his comments.

“He was president, OK? … Blame him, or don’t blame him, but he was president. The World Trade Center came down during his reign,” Trump said.

Read More→

Comments (0)
Oct
13

I am Debbie. I am The Gatekeeper.

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Whatever has possessed DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz is creating a buildup of negative human emotions in her party, and it must be stopped before it produces a psychomagnotheric slime flow of immense proportions.

Who ya gonna call? Beats me.

First off, The Gatekeeper has decided in the face of dissension in her ranks that there will be only six Democratic debates. “We’re going to have six debates. Period,” Wasserman Schultz told a Christian Science Monitor breakfast in September.

By limiting the number of debates, the DNC is “ceding the discussion and attention to the Republicans,” Martin O’Malley’s campaign manager told Politico. Plus, it gives the appearance that the DNC is protecting front runner Hillary Clinton. If The Gatekeeper is trying hard to appear impartial (as I read somewhere), she is leaving the opposite impression. DNC vice chairs, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and former Minneapolis mayor R.T. Rybak, have also called for more debates, and the chatter among other members is not favorable to Wasserman Schultz.

Read More→

Comments (0)