Archive for Open Thread

Jan
12

49ers v. Panthers

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panthers

As some Hooligans already know, I live in the San Francisco Bay Area. As such I’m an unabashed 49er fan. But I know what you guys have been through with your team. So if you guys win I might have a vague sorta ok feeling for about two minutes. Naw, that’s not possible!!

Seriously, in all good sportsmanship, this is your NFC Division Playoff Game open thread!

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Jan
10

Friday Open Thread

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Working overtime. Please take up the slack.

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Jan
03

Friday Open Thread

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Wasn’t yesterday Monday?

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Dec
27

Friday Open Thread

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This from Charles Lenchner at dKos:

A new report published by a German think tank is worth looking at. World Protests 2006-1013 doesn’t contain any major surprises, but our communities should take a look. The short version: citizens are angry at the world’s elites. More of them are taking to the streets. And increasingly, the protestors are sophisticated enough to place a finger on the lack of real democracy because of unaccountable corporations and multinational institutions.

Your next, big chance to participate is February 8, just down the road in Raleigh. Lots of your friends will be there.

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Dec
24

Soulful Christmas Open Thread

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JB is thankful. You?

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Dec
20

Friday Open Thread

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For those who missed Barry’s comment, the Nation‘s John Nichols included “Mountain Moral Monday” in the Progressive Honor Roll of 2013 as “Most Valuable Protest” in America this year:

When up to 10,000 North Carolinians rallied August 5 on Mountain Moral Monday in Asheville, the Rev. William Barber II, president of the state NAACP, announced: “This is no momentary hyperventilation and liberal screaming match. This is a movement.” The protests against legislative attacks on voting rights, public education and programs for low-income families began last spring at the state Capitol in Raleigh. But when the GOP-controlled legislature adjourned, the massive rally in Asheville signaled that the movement had spread. Barber declared that “from the mountains to the coast,” there is a movement for “a new South, a new North Carolina and a new future.”

What makes your Honor Roll?

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Dec
13

Friday Open Thread

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So what did I miss?

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Dec
06

Friday Open Thread

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“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.” –Nelson Mandela

Mandela’s Death Leaves South Africa Without Its Moral Center

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Nov
29

Black Friday Open Thread

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Something to lighten up the blackness of the consumer frenzy.

IDIOTS from BLR_VFX on Vimeo.

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Nov
22

Friday 50 Years Later Open Thread

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Fifty years ago today, November 22, I was in Scout Room in the basement of St. Celestine’s Catholic School in Elmwood Park, IL, a close-in Chicago suburb. It was, like today, a Friday. Friday afternoon. I was sitting on the right side of the classroom, halfway down the row of wooden desks against the windows that looked out into the window well. The sun was streaming in through the grating above when the news came over the P.A. that President John F. Kennedy, the first Catholic president, had been shot in Dallas. There was no further news on his condition. We prayed the rosary, then school let out early. The world had stopped.

It was not the first death I had experienced as a child. Three years earlier, my uncle had died in the Park Slope mid-air collision over New York City. Still, the news was dramatic and alarming, yet incomprehensible.

Last night while driving back to my hotel, NPR’s “All Things Considered” aired a feature about the reaction at a Boston Symphony concert when the news arrived. Conductor Erich Leinsdorf delivered the news and, as the shocked audience’s gasps echoed in the hall, announced that the orchestra would play the funeral march from Beethoven’s Third Symphony. A second wave of gasps, as the finality of the news sank in.

I had never heard this tape before.

Later, during a scheduled intermission, the musicians debated backstage whether it was appropriate to go on. Ultimately, Henry B. Cabot, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s president of trustees, decided the music should continue.

Cabot addressed the audience, “The ladies and gentlemen of the orchestra came to me during intermission, and some of them felt that we should not continue the concert. I told them that I thought we should continue. And I told them that the day my father died,” Cabot said, his voice cracking, “I came to a symphony concert for consolation. And I believe you will receive it yourselves.”

Fifty years later, I teared up behind the wheel.

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