Nov
21

Trent Reznor’s “Warning”

By

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKZg-RswIco&eurl=http://www.crooksandliars.com/[/youtube]

thx C&L

Comments

  1. Arratik says:

    An interesting (albeit geeky) thing about this particular NIN song – it’s an example of audio steganography (in this case, hiding images in sound).

    Here’s the cover of Year Zero:

    Notice the weird, almost reptilian hand appearing in front of the car’s windshield.

    If you listen to the very end of “The Warning”, you’ll hear about six seconds of what sounds like processed white noise. If you were to rip that track into WAV format, open it in an audio editor like Audacity and switch the view from waveform to spectral analysis, you’ll see the hand.

    Here’s a waveform view of the end of “The Warning”:

    And here’s the spectral view:

    It’s kinda neat, eh?

  2. If you were to rip that track into WAV format, open it in an audio editor like Audacity and switch the view from waveform to spectral analysis

    you lost me at ” … rip that track into WAV” 🙄

  3. Arratik says:

    WAV = uncompressed audio file native to Windows.

    Sorry for the geekout. But the pictures are cool, right? 🙂

  4. Doug Gibson says:

    And spectral view is . . . what? It sounds like either a reference to colors or the sort of thing Scooby Doo and the gang went after.

  5. Arratik says:

    The “spectral view” option of most audio editing programs generates a spectrogram (alternatively known as a sonogram, voiceprint, etc., depending on the application). It’s a 3D plot of an audio signal’s changes in frequency over time. Simply put, the “darker” the color, the greater the signal’s “intensity”.

    Wikipedia does a better job of explaining this than I can. And in English, too. Toward the end of that Wiki entry there’s a list of several downloadable programs that can do the opposite – generate sound from an image that can, in turn, be viewed in a spectrogram. I suspect that Trent Reznor used one of these to generate the aforementioned sound on this particular song. He’s not the first to do this (I think that honor goes to Aphex Twin), but it’s probably the best-selling example.

    Again, my apologies. I can be a bit of a nerd about this sort of thing at times.